Roundup in Wine?

Roundup in Wine?

Roundup in Wine? 

An alert reader from College Park, Georgia forwarded a link to me about a study showing “toxic” levels of the weed killer Roundup appear in California wines. What was alarming according to the authors was Roundup appeared even in wines organically grown. 

A couple of years ago a group called Moms Across America published a study that alarmed many consumers claiming that the weed killer Roundup (glycophosphate) showed up in California wines. The MAA group has admirably championed organic, biodynamic and sustainable agriculture while vociferously campaigning against GMO crops. However, the study they cite is flawed in many ways. They only tested 10 wines they claimed to have come from Napa, Sonoma and Mendocino counties, but the only wine they actually identified by name was from Santa Barbara County, 350 miles away. The study was self-funded, with no published methodology or peer review and so this report bears all the hallmarks of “fake news”. 

That said, MAA set off alarm bells because they found in the worst case, 18.4parts per billion of in California wine. The best wine had a level less than one part per billion of glycophosphate. The EPA and the European Union allow a concentration of 700 ppb of glycophosphate in drinking water before it reaches unsafe levels. The volume of wine consumed is much less compared to water which would mean the unsafe level threshold in wine would be much higher for wine. An adult would have to drink 2,500 glasses of wine a day containing the highest glyphosate residue measured every day for 70 years just to reach the U.S. EnvironmentalProtection Agency's preliminary level of health concern. It never hurts to state the obvious, but 2,500 glasses is well above the recommended 1 glass of wine a day for women and 1-2 glasses for men.  

One last item about the study: glycophosphate is not on any list as a carcinogenic or geno-toxic agent. The United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization, theEuropean Union and the EPA all agree on this. In my opinion, this MAA report lacks transparency on what danger their findings show for American consumers. If anything, it shows once again that wine consumed in moderation is safe, healthy, and wise.